World War 2: an obsession
I've heard some things about a very small number of blacks working for nazi germany during the war. Is this true? o_O

It is! Although the ethnicities recruited by the SS & Wehrmacht were generally more Asian in origin, not so many recruits from Africa. Read the story of Yang Kyoungjong (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yang_Kyoungjong), while it’s on the extreme end of things it gives you an idea of how people were press ganged into various armies. 

Kamikaze aircraft to go on display for first time
The Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka, which would have been flown by Japanese suicide bombers, is to form part of an exhibition at the Fleet Air Arm Museum.

A rare surviving Kamikaze aircraft seized by the British at the end of World War II is to go on display for the first time.


The aircraft, which would have been flown by a Japanese pilot on a suicide mission, was one of just four brought back to Britain from the Far East to display in museums.


It is not known what ever happened to the other three, but this Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka 11 has been kept in storage for the last 30 years at the Fleet Air Arm Museum near Yeovil, Somerset.


Staff have now wheeled it out in preparation for a lengthy refurbishment before they plan to exhibit it as part of an exhibition on the Pacific War in two years time.


Part of the renovation process will involve stripping back the paint applied to it after the war layer by layer to reveal its original design.

The Kamikaze planes were an effective way of bombing US aircraft carriers and ships during the conflict as the pilots could direct them straight at their targets.
They were attached to the underside of Japanese bombers and dropped from a height of 12,000ft, with 1,200kg of explosives crammed into their front end.
Three solid fuel rockets launched the crafts at speeds of 475mph while the pilot aimed it downwards towards enemy ships until impact.
Judging by the surviving example, the cockpits were very basic inside and were not built for the comfort of the suicidal pilot.
Jon Jefferies, a spokesman for the Fleet Air Arm Museum, said: “It is quite chilling to be sat in the cockpit looking out through the window through the ringed sight.
"It has a hard steal seat so it obviously wasn’t built for comfort.
"There is a grab handle fixed to the inner wall of the cockpit so you can imagine the poor pilot reaching out for it as the acceleration generated by the three rockets would have been incredible.
"It has been here for 30 years but we have got it out now as it will be refurbished and go on public display in time for our next exhibition about the war in the Pacific."
There is a hatch on one side of the aircraft that would have been opened to arm the explosives in the nose.
There is also an emblem of a cherry blossom on the other side, from which the Ohka took its name. In Japan, it is a symbol of flowering and rebirth.
The series of Ohka 11 Kamikaze planes were mainly used in April 1945 during the America landings at Okinawa.
Various insignia on the Ohka has recently been translated by staff at the museum.
Mr Jefferies said: “I was rather hoping the markings might reflect the attitude of the Japanes, like ‘For the glory of the Emperor.’
"However, the symbols read ‘outer plate, surface of the upper from rear sight. Foresight. Centre to height. 148.0mm."

stolen from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/10627029/Kamikaze-aircraft-to-go-on-display-for-first-time.html

Kamikaze aircraft to go on display for first time

The Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka, which would have been flown by Japanese suicide bombers, is to form part of an exhibition at the Fleet Air Arm Museum.

A rare surviving Kamikaze aircraft seized by the British at the end of World War II is to go on display for the first time.

The aircraft, which would have been flown by a Japanese pilot on a suicide mission, was one of just four brought back to Britain from the Far East to display in museums.

It is not known what ever happened to the other three, but this Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka 11 has been kept in storage for the last 30 years at the Fleet Air Arm Museum near Yeovil, Somerset.

Staff have now wheeled it out in preparation for a lengthy refurbishment before they plan to exhibit it as part of an exhibition on the Pacific War in two years time.

Part of the renovation process will involve stripping back the paint applied to it after the war layer by layer to reveal its original design.

The Kamikaze planes were an effective way of bombing US aircraft carriers and ships during the conflict as the pilots could direct them straight at their targets.

They were attached to the underside of Japanese bombers and dropped from a height of 12,000ft, with 1,200kg of explosives crammed into their front end.

Three solid fuel rockets launched the crafts at speeds of 475mph while the pilot aimed it downwards towards enemy ships until impact.

Judging by the surviving example, the cockpits were very basic inside and were not built for the comfort of the suicidal pilot.

Jon Jefferies, a spokesman for the Fleet Air Arm Museum, said: “It is quite chilling to be sat in the cockpit looking out through the window through the ringed sight.

"It has a hard steal seat so it obviously wasn’t built for comfort.

"There is a grab handle fixed to the inner wall of the cockpit so you can imagine the poor pilot reaching out for it as the acceleration generated by the three rockets would have been incredible.

"It has been here for 30 years but we have got it out now as it will be refurbished and go on public display in time for our next exhibition about the war in the Pacific."

There is a hatch on one side of the aircraft that would have been opened to arm the explosives in the nose.

There is also an emblem of a cherry blossom on the other side, from which the Ohka took its name. In Japan, it is a symbol of flowering and rebirth.

The series of Ohka 11 Kamikaze planes were mainly used in April 1945 during the America landings at Okinawa.

Various insignia on the Ohka has recently been translated by staff at the museum.

Mr Jefferies said: “I was rather hoping the markings might reflect the attitude of the Japanes, like ‘For the glory of the Emperor.’

"However, the symbols read ‘outer plate, surface of the upper from rear sight. Foresight. Centre to height. 148.0mm."

stolen from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-two/10627029/Kamikaze-aircraft-to-go-on-display-for-first-time.html

can you tell me the influences of world war 2 in our lives today? pleaseeeeee
Anonymous

Is this your homework or something?

There are SO MANY ways in which WW2 has shaped our world that I don’t think I could barely scratch the surface. The deaths of 2.5% of the world’s population on it’s own (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WW2_casualties) is something that could be talked about for hours, nevermind the technology that it spawned (the atom bomb, jet propulsion), the set up for the cold war, baby boomers… so many things are directly attributable to the war I doubt your teacher will mark you down for not covering all of them!

US Fascist party rally in NYC prior to WW2. It’s not surprising that a lot of support for Hitler in the west prior to the war has subsequently been brushed under the carpet. A lot of rich American industrialists admired him & the fascist ideals, they saw a lot of promise in him. General Franco received a lot of support from the US during the Spanish civil war & they also did their best to block help & shipments for the republicans. The Brits were definitely guilty of obstructing help for the republicans as well. Hitler was on the cover of Time magazine in 1938 & not as an enemy. He’d brought Germany from the depths of depression to become one of the more prosperous countries in Europe. 

US Fascist party rally in NYC prior to WW2. It’s not surprising that a lot of support for Hitler in the west prior to the war has subsequently been brushed under the carpet. A lot of rich American industrialists admired him & the fascist ideals, they saw a lot of promise in him. General Franco received a lot of support from the US during the Spanish civil war & they also did their best to block help & shipments for the republicans. The Brits were definitely guilty of obstructing help for the republicans as well. Hitler was on the cover of Time magazine in 1938 & not as an enemy. He’d brought Germany from the depths of depression to become one of the more prosperous countries in Europe. 

can you tell me anything about the swing kids or swingjugend? or do you have any pictures
Anonymous

demons:

Generally, the response given to those of the Swing Youth was to throw them in jail or the labor camps. They were less explicit in their opposition to the Party and state, and usually were upper-middle class who came from money and generally went against the grind. The so-called swing movement challenged the regime by rejecting its cultural prescriptions and dancing to American-style jazz and dressing/speaking in a very English fashion. When public dances became too popular and banned, they formed “swing clubs”

and I think I have some pictures if you look under /tagged/swingjugend

but you’re in luck anon, I have an exact copy of a Gestapo document concerning the Swing Kids. The Gestapo filed it under "Report on "Swing" Dancing as a Form of Resistance," and it was written in 1942 after police busted up a Swing Club in Hamburg.

A small relevant excerpt from the document:

Read More

historicalwwiigermany:

The Close Combat Clasp (German: Nahkampfspange) is a German military award instituted on 25 November 1942 for achievement in hand to hand fighting in close quarters. The Close Combat Clasp was worn above the upper left uniform pocket. The clasp was die-cast and made of either tombac or later zinc, with a slightly curved and hand centerpiece consisting of the national emblem surmounting a crossed bayonet and hand grenade.

The award was bestowed in three classes:

For 15 battles of close combat a Bronze Class was awarded.

For 25 battles of close combat a Silver Class was awarded.

For 50+ battles of close combat a Gold Class was awarded.

In order to receive this distinguished decoration, all battles and their dates had to be officially documented by the battle commander, verified by the general in charge and authenticated by several divisions of the war department. It was possible that more than one close combat battle per day was fought and therefore recorded as a separate entity.

An exemption was made if the soldier was wounded in battle so badly that his injuries precluded a return to the front. In such a case, the criteria were reduced to 10, 20 and 40 battles. The highest number of battles in combat recorded is listed at 84 by SS-Hauptscharführer Hermann Maringgele.

The Gold Close Combat Clasp was often regarded in higher esteem than the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross by the German infantry. Of the roughly 18–20 million soldiers of the German Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS, 36,400 received the Bronze Class, 9,500 the Silver Class and 631 the Gold Class.

In 1944 a version for the German Air Force was created to note the increasing number of Air Force personnel and paratroopers taking part in direct combat.

The decoration was designed by the military artist Wilhelm Ernst Peekhaus. Normally on the reverse left side of all CCC you will find the “FEC” meaning from the Latin “Fecit” (made by) followed by “W.E. Peekhaus” (the artist name) and Berlin. On the right side the manufacturer’s logo or name. The badge was die-cast and made of only Zinc, depending on the manufacturer the clasp is straight or slightly curved. The design shows a central motif consisting of the national emblem surmounting a crossed bayonet and hand grenade. The centerpiece was cut out and backed with a thin, flat square steel, crimped in place on the reverse. The badge was lacquered with a composition called “Brennlack,” which was a powdered metal. When oven heated the paint was burned, leaving a metallic type coating that will flake off with time. The pins are normally wider in the center, tapering at the ends. The length of the CCC varies between 95 to 97mm. The weight could be anything between 24 and 37gms depending on the metal used.

Font.

Photos: Alois EiseleGerhard Schmidhuber and Josef Schneider.

#1: Adolf Hitler, age 35, on his release from Landesberg Prison, on December 20, 1924. Hitler had been convicted of treason for his role in an attempted coup in 1923 called the Beer Hall Putsch. This photograph was taken shortly after he finished dictating “Mein Kampf” to deputy Rudolf Hess. Eight years later, Hitler would be sworn in as Chancellor of Germany, in 1933. (Library of Congress)

#2: A Japanese soldier stands guard over part of the captured Great Wall of China in 1937, during the Second Sino-Japanese War. The Empire of Japan and the Republic of China had been at war intermittently since 1931, but the conflict escalated in 1937. (LOC)

#3: Japanese aircraft carries out a bombing run over targets in China in 1937. (LOC)

#4: Japanese soldiers involved in street fighting in Shanghai, China in 1937. The battle of Shanghai lasted from August through November of 1937, eventually involving nearly one million troops. In the end, Shanghai fell to the Japanese, after over 150,000 casualties combined.(LOC)

#5: First pictures of the Japanese occupation of Peiping (Beijing) in China, on August 13, 1937. Under the banner of the rising sun, Japanese troops are shown passing from the Chinese City of Peiping into the Tartar City through Chen-men, the main gate leading onward to the palaces in the Forbidden City. Just a stone’s throw away is the American Embassy, where American residents of Peiping flocked when Sino-Japanese hostilities were at their worst. (AP Photo)

#6: Japanese soldiers execute captured Chinese soldiers with bayonets in a trench as other Japanese soldiers watch from rim. (LOC)

#7: Chinese General Chiang Kai-shek, right, head of the Nanking government at Canton, with General Lung Yun, chairman of the Yunan provincial government in Nanking, on June 27, 1936. (AP Photo)

#8: On Feb. 5, 1938, A Chinese woman surveys the remains of her family, all of whom met death during Japanese occupation of Nanking, allegedly victims of atrocities at the hands of Japanese soldiers. (AP Photo)

#9: Buddhist priests of the Big Asakusa Temple prepare for the Second Sino-Japanese War as they wear gas masks during training against future aerial attacks in Tokyo, Japan, on May 30, 1936. (AP Photo)

#10: Italian Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, center, hands on hips, with members of the fascist Party, in Rome, Italy, Oct. 28, 1922, following their March on Rome. This march was an act of intimidation, where thousands of fascist blackshirts occupied strategic positions throughout much of Italy. Following the march, King Emanuelle III asked Mussolini to form a new government, clearing the way towards a dictatorship. (AP Photo)

What kind of fuckin idiot are you?
Anonymous

The best kind, obviously.

I watched all 3 episodes of this 2013 German made WW2 drama last night. It’s really interesting to see a slightly different perspective &  I thoroughly enjoyed it, hence all 3 episodes in one sitting. 

It’s not currently available anywhere but there’s a good torrent with English subs on pirate bay so I suggest you go there for it. 

I made a case for all my stabby things out of an old window & a pallet I found on the street. I think it turned out ok.